It’s Ok to Take it Easy Sometimes

This past few weeks has been pretty chaotic for me.

Money has been an issue, I moved to a new city, my nephew was born, I got a new writing job, I had my 29th birthday, I had to housesit for a while and on top of everything else I’ve been working myself into a tizzy over a potential relationship which may or may not work out.

All said and done, I came to the realization last night that yes, I had done it, I had overwhelmed myself wholly and completely.

Stress can be a killer, even more so for someone who has a mental illness.

That’s what life does to us though, there’s always something to deal with. At times we can get so caught up in this loop of dealing with things that we forget about our own well-being, our own peace of mind.

Everyone knows what it’s like to get overwhelmed, to get so buried in the day-to-day that we only know we need to reevaluate things when we find ourselves slumped on the kitchen floor crying over a broken glass.

I’m usually very good at recognizing when I need to put a brake on things but in my recovery, as I’ve become more resilient to small stressors I often lose sight of how I’m feeling and instead, push on through until I find myself aggravated, sad and ready to post a vaguely suicidal cry for help on facebook.

The point I’m trying to make here is that we all get overwhelmed sometimes and because of that, we need to allow ourselves the chance to unwind, take a break and take it easy.

I know that sometimes if we don’t feel like we are accomplishing something we can feel lazy and stagnant but sometimes we need that time of doing nothing to regain a grip on who we are, how we feel, and what makes us tick.

The biggest thing is allowing ourselves to let go for a while if we’re in the midst of a particularly dense fog of life.

When that overwhelmed feeling comes we need to accept that we don’t have all the time in the world, all the tools to deal with it, and all the resiliency that it takes to fix everything.

The point is, it’s ok to feel overwhelmed. You’re allowed to feel that way.

It’s also ok to take some time to yourself, you’re allowed to unwind and refresh if you need to.

Sometimes the problems we feel can be fixed by a nice walk in the evening, a hot shower, a good meal and a good sleep. Sometimes we need an extended sabbatical.

In either situation though, it’s ok to do what you need to do in order to reevaluate things and get a better grip on how to handle things.

If you’re feeling overwhelmed, take some time, I know I need to, especially after the last few weeks.

Part of coping is knowing that you need to de-stress once in a while and with that comes the realization that life is but a series of events and whatever you’re feeling at this place and time, especially if it’s completely overwhelming, will pass.

The day will come when you realize you got through it. Seeing that you’ve weathered the storm will give you strength.

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Comments

  1. Hi my son, is schizophrenic, and refuses medication. He is loosing more of himself daily. Refuses the diagnosis and just thinks it is spiritual warfare. I love him so much, and just want to help him into reality. He is college educated and has vast potential. Any help or advice is much appreciated, Sincerely, L. R.

    • I’m a mental health counselor at a prison and have many individuals with one of the Schizophrenia type diagnosis on my caseload. Your son is lucky to have a supportive parent like you. What I would recommend is use his intellect to keep him in real world. He knows he has mental illness, but he doesn’t have insight to the extent of it. Addressing his symptoms will pushing him away from reality and he is not ready for that. Focus on concrete stuff anything that doesn’t need to talk about his mental illness. Keep him busy and occupied, don’t let him isolate himself. Keep him engaged with activities, groups, games, gym, walking, etc. Keep it simple and practical. Help him to find his passion and help him turn that into a goal. Keep it at “here and now”. He knows he has mental illness and knows about some of his psychosis, you don’t want him to identify with his psychosis, and isolate himself because then he’ll lose touch with reality. Find a support group for him and yourself with NAMI. I hope this helps.

  2. I’m a mental health counselor and have many individuals with one of the Schizophrenia type diagnosis on my caseload. Your son is lucky to have a supportive parent like you. What I would recommend is use his intellect to keep him in real world. He knows he has mental illness, but he doesn’t have insight to the extent of it. Addressing his symptoms will pushing him away from reality and he is not ready for that. Focus on concrete stuff anything that doesn’t need to talk about his mental illness. Keep him busy and occupied, don’t let him isolate himself. Keep him engaged with activities, groups, games, gym, walking, etc. Keep it simple and practical. Help him to find his passion and help him turn that into a goal. Keep it at “here and now”. He knows he has mental illness and knows about some of his psychosis, you don’t want him to identify with his psychosis, and isolate himself because then he’ll lose touch with reality. Find a support group for him and yourself with NAMI. I hope this helps.

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